A Shop that Sells Only One Product?

A marketing lesson, this time, from Lisbon (@Portugal). A while ago, I was working in Lisbon and I came across this store (see picture) What do you think they sell? Believe it or not, this company invested literally dozens of thousands of Euros in decorating their point of sales as a circus to sell one single product, just one. Not electronics, neither apparel, or sporting goods. They sell sardines, and only sardines. Yes, you read it right, the fish, sardine! At “O Mondo Fantastico da Sardinha Portughesa” (@mondosardinhaportuguesa) they really made a bet for customer experience at the point of sale. And it is not a new comer, this business was founded 74 years ago! And they only have one product: 160 grs canned sardines. They have one specific can for each year (making it a collectible) and started in 1916 so you can buy any of the 100 different cans marked with an event and a historical character that was born for each one of those years. Each can sells for €5...

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Alleluia! CMOs (and Marketing) Are Back at the Top!

In its 20th annual Hot Jobs report, leading global executive search firm CTPartners identifies newsworthy executive roles for 2015 (Read more). Guess who’s at the top? CMOs! This means that corporations are considering marketing strategic to the business (not only to communication) again. There are two main reasons for this: digitalization (bringing massive segmentation and traceability to its pick), and accountability…remember… “Show me the money!”

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Marketing to Save the World

 

Yes, marketing can save the world. How? check this video for a challenging view on a new marketing management model that can change the way we do projects and campaigns, and the world itself. 

Humanity has changed and although we may have not yet realized it, the opportunity for a global qualitative improvement is now more at our fingertips than ever.

Innovation and marketing must satisfy needs. These needs will always be functional and/or emotional. The question is, who decides which needs are met first and at what price? Governments and public organizations have tried to respond through a “social” or “state” prioritization, often with a diffuse or not very transparent sense of the common good (common for whom?). The rest of the needs of society are solved under the criterion of an income statement: what comes in must be greater than what goes out to be convenient and sustainable over time. Businesses must make money through the marketing they deploy,...

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